Radian & Michron Timelapse

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
    2
    Shares

I was recently asked to test and provide my thoughts on two pieces of timelapse gear; the Radian & Michron.

Radian Timelapse Device by Alpine Labs

Radian Timelapse Device by Alpine Labs

After taking the gear out a few times I have to say that both of them are quite useful to have in your bag if you’re interested in making timelapse footage. The biggest benefits in my opinion (I’m not a timelapse expert) is the portability and the ability to control all of the settings on your phone. A lot of motion-controlled timelapse gear involves sliders and multiple tripods among other things which is the opposite of portable so the Radian makes things a lot easier for panning effects. And if you’re just doing static footage then the Michron easily fits into your hotshoe. Pretty cool! It won’t break the bank either.

Some tips I learned through my own mistakes:

1. If you want smoother footage, make the duration between frames shorter and use manual focus.
2. Have big memory cards.
3. To prevent flickery footage then use manual exposure.
4. If doing a panning effect then make sure the bubble level is completely even.
4. Make sure burst mode is turned off otherwise the footage will be choppy.
5. How you process the video is very important. Aim for at least a 20 FPS frame rate. Ideally 24 or 30 FPS if there is lots of movement.

Check out the Alpine Labs site for more info.


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
    2
    Shares

3 thoughts

  1. It turned out quite well I think. I’ve dabbled with time lapse using my backup 30D but I never seem to be in one location long enough. Despite shooting in manual I’ve always seemed to have a problem with flickering too. Did you use any software to alleviate potential flickering in your example above? I hear it works quite well, but I don’t own any of it.

    • Thanks Michael. I didn’t do anything really. I just converted the RAW to jpeg and imported them into Picasa, played around with various FPS settings then automated the timelapse. If you really want to make a serious timelapse film then Final Cut Pro or Premiere will probably be your best bet if you want to smooth out any rough edges.

  2. Pingback: Three Dot Lounge for Photography for March 16, 2015

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *